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A wise investment in our future

We firmly believe that investing in people’s nutrition is a humanitarian imperative. But we also believe that it is a wise investment in monetary terms.

A wise investment in our future

We firmly believe that investing in people’s nutrition is a social imperative. But we also believe that it is a wise investment in monetary terms.

 

Taking a pragmatic, business-like approach to meeting the major challenges facing our planet, in 2004, 2008 and 2012 the Copenhagen Consensus invited a panel of eminent economists from around the world to look for cost-efficient solutions. This panel concluded that in terms of the benefit-to-cost ratio, micronutrient-based interventions consistently represent among the best of all possible development investments. Improving nutrition is clearly a highly cost-effective intervention with returns on investments up to 30:1 (Copenhagen Consensus 2012).

According to the Copenhagen Consensus 2012

Fighting malnourishment should be the top priority for policy-makers and philanthropists

Bundled micronutrient interventions to fight hunger and improve education  is the most desirable of all potential investments.

 

The World Bank concurs on food fortification:

“The control of vitamin and mineral deficiencies is one of the most extraordinary development-related scientific advances of recent years. Probably no other technology available today offers as large an opportunity to improve lives and accelerate development at such low cost and in such a short time.”

 

According to the Copenhagen Consensus Center’s Post-2015 Consensus

Addressing chronic malnutrition yields highest returns on investment and should be a top priority.

Reducing by 40% the number of children who are stunted provides a return on investment of 45:1.

 

Eliminating micronutrient deficiencies is such a crucial goal because of the wealth of opportunity for human, social and economic prosperity it offers. A fight we can only win by working together.

 

Taking a pragmatic, business-like approach to meeting the major challenges facing our planet, in 2004, 2008 and 2012 the Copenhagen Consensus invited a panel of eminent economists from around the world to look for cost-efficient solutions. This panel concluded that in terms of the benefit-to-cost ratio, micronutrient-based interventions consistently represent among the best of all possible development investments. Improving nutrition is clearly a highly cost-effective intervention with returns on investments up to 30:1 (Copenhagen Consensus 2012).

According to the Copenhagen Consensus 2012

Fighting malnourishment should be the top priority for policy-makers and philanthropists

Bundled micronutrient interventions to fight hunger and improve education  is the most desirable of all potential investments.

 

The World Bank concurs on food fortification:

“The control of vitamin and mineral deficiencies is one of the most extraordinary development-related scientific advances of recent years. Probably no other technology available today offers as large an opportunity to improve lives and accelerate development at such low cost and in such a short time.”

 

According to the Copenhagen Consensus Center’s Post-2015 Consensus

Addressing chronic malnutrition yields highest returns on investment and should be a top priority.

Reducing by 40% the number of children who are stunted provides a return on investment of 45:1.

 

Eliminating micronutrient deficiencies is such a crucial goal because of the wealth of opportunity for human, social and economic prosperity it offers. A fight we can only win by working together.

 

Taking a pragmatic, business-like approach to meeting the major challenges facing our planet, in 2004, 2008 and 2012 the Copenhagen Consensus invited a panel of eminent economists from around the world to look for cost-efficient solutions. This panel concluded that in terms of the benefit-to-cost ratio, micronutrient-based interventions consistently represent among the best of all possible development investments. Improving nutrition is clearly a highly cost-effective intervention with returns on investments up to 30:1 (Copenhagen Consensus 2012).

According to the Copenhagen Consensus 2012

Fighting malnourishment should be the top priority for policy-makers and philanthropists

Bundled micronutrient interventions to fight hunger and improve education  is the most desirable of all potential investments.

 

The World Bank concurs on food fortification:

“The control of vitamin and mineral deficiencies is one of the most extraordinary development-related scientific advances of recent years. Probably no other technology available today offers as large an opportunity to improve lives and accelerate development at such low cost and in such a short time.”

 

According to the Copenhagen Consensus Center’s Post-2015 Consensus

Addressing chronic malnutrition yields highest returns on investment and should be a top priority.

Reducing by 40% the number of children who are stunted provides a return on investment of 45:1.

 

Eliminating micronutrient deficiencies is such a crucial goal because of the wealth of opportunity for human, social and economic prosperity it offers. A fight we can only win by working together.

Taking a pragmatic, business-like approach to meeting the major challenges facing our planet, in 2004, 2008 and 2012 the Copenhagen Consensus invited a panel of eminent economists from around the world to look for cost-efficient solutions. This panel concluded that in terms of the benefit-to-cost ratio, micronutrient-based interventions consistently represent among the best of all possible development investments. Improving nutrition is clearly a highly cost-effective intervention with returns on investments up to 30:1 (Copenhagen Consensus 2012).

According to the Copenhagen Consensus 2012

  • Fighting malnourishment should be the top priority for policy-makers and philanthropists
  • Bundled micronutrient interventions to fight hunger and improve education  is the most desirable of all potential investments.

The World Bank concurs on food fortification “The control of vitamin and mineral deficiencies is one of the most extraordinary development-related scientific advances of recent years. Probably no other technology available today offers as large an opportunity to improve lives and accelerate development at such low cost and in such a short time.

According to the Copenhagen Consensus Center’s Post-2015 Consensus

  • Addressing chronic malnutrition yields highest returns on investment and should be a top priority.
  • Reducing by 40% the number of children who are stunted provides a return on investment of 45:1.

Eliminating micronutrient deficiencies is such a crucial goal because of the wealth of opportunity for human, social and economic prosperity it offers. A fight we can only win by working together.

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