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Providing perspectives on recent research into vitamins and nutritionals

    Pills / vitamins woman

    Update on Supplemental Folic Acid During Later Pregnancy

    One of our most popular posts looks at whether supplemental folic acid is worthwhile in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. A group of researchers lead by Wang have now conducted a study that looks at supplemental folic acid use during pregnancy and risk of pre-eclampsia that provides more evidence in favor of continuing supplementation during pregnancy.

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    Should Pregnant Women Be Screened or Routinely Supplemented to Prevent Iron Deficiency Anemia?

    Pregnant women are at high risk of iron deficiency anemia, and the US Preventive Services Taskforce (USPSTF) recently updated their guidelines regarding screening for iron deficiency, or its prevention with routine supplementation. Pregnancy increases the demand for iron as both the fetus and the mother’s circulatory system require the production of iron-containing red blood cells. For this reason, guidelines for iron intake are much higher than for women who are not pregnant.

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    Fortification and Enrichment of Whole-Grain Wheat Flours: The Case for Folic Acid

    For many children, the favorite foods are all the same: French fries, pizza, sausages in all shapes and forms, candy, and white bread. For a short period of time, however, my daughter bucked the white bread trend: she was also a chocoholic and ate dark brown bread readily in the hope that it was chocolate-flavored. Ms Almost-Five has wised up to the situation, and like “normal” children she also prefers white bread. White bread is enriched so that it contains the B-vitamins of whole grain flour, however whole grain flour is not fortified with folic acid. How does choice of whole grain vs. white wheat-based products affect folate intakes?

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    Vitamin D, DHA, Lactating Women and their Babies

    Colostrum, the milk produced during the first few days of lactation, is particularly rich in nutrients needed by infants. The nutritional content of human milk continues to change during the course of the lactation and differs among women.

    Human breast milk does not contain enough vitamin D (or vitamin K) to meet infant requirements. Two options exist. Both involve increasing vitamin D intake by 1) infants directly or 2) the mother to increase the vitamin D content of her breast milk. 

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    EFSA Affirms Safety and Benefits of Vitamin E

    The Scientific Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources issued a scientific opinion that all forms of vitamin E, natural and synthetic, are not of safety concern at the levels used in food. They set a upper limit (UL) of 300 mg daily.

    The Panel recommended re-assessing the data on other tocopherols, namely γ-tocopherol and δ-tocopherol, as more data become available. 

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